security

What are the top security responsibilities for retailers online?

The holiday season is upon us and with the host of new regulations varying from city, region or country, many traditional retailers are closing their physical stores and pivoting to ecommerce. In fact, the global pandemic has already contributed to a 30 percent surge of online shopping. The uncertainty at this time means that many retailers prioritized business continuity over web security as they rush to sell online. While this swift transition allowed many businesses to continue trading, they present a bountiful opportunity for cybercriminals and unethical hackers.

While the previously mentioned challenges have proliferated across all levels of industry, no business, regardless of size, is immune from cyberattack. To quantify the potential web application attack surface of major ecommerce retailers, we researched and analyzed potential application security flaws to gauge the true picture of the attack surface posed to the top retail businesses, according to Deloitte. This research was

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Third-party online assets a growing security risk for retailers

83% of the top U.S. retailers have connections to a vulnerable third-party asset, and 43% have vulnerabilities that pose an immediate cybersecurity risk, Cyberpion reveals.

cybersecurity retailers

In addition, the company found that 30% of these retailers have an asset that either was, or is currently being abused, in an active hacking campaign, and 23% have a compromised asset that is under the control of attackers.

“This holiday season is a perfect storm for the retail industry given increased e-commerce activity due to COVID-19, and the heavy reliance of retailers on third party providers of tracking, behavior, analytics and advertising services,” said Cyberpion CRO Ran Nahmias.

“These services often represent thousands of points of vulnerability, greatly enlarging retailers’ attack surfaces for hackers to capitalize on. The problem is that retailers aren’t aware that some of the biggest threats to their customers and businesses exist outside the traditional perimeter. Solutions like firewalls and

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Hong Kong media tycoon Jimmy Lai reportedly charged under security law

HONG KONG — Hong Kong pro-democracy activist and media tycoon Jimmy Lai has been charged under the city’s national security law, amid a widening crackdown on dissent, according to local media reports.

Lai, who founded the Apple Daily tabloid, was charged on suspicion of colluding with foreign forces and endangering national security, local broadcaster TVB reported Friday.

He is the most high-profile person out of more than two dozen charged under the law, since it was implemented in June.

Police said in a statement that they had arrested a 73-year-old man under the national security law, but did not name him.

Lai is scheduled to appear in court on Dec. 12, and could face a maximum punishment of life imprisonment.

Lai was arrested under the national security law in August. He and two executives of Next Digital, the company that operates the Apple Daily newspaper, were later charged with fraud

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Hong Kong media tycoon Jimmy Lai charged under national security law

HONG KONG (Reuters) – Hong Kong democracy activist and media tycoon Jimmy Lai, 73, has been charged under the city’s national security law on suspicion of colluding with foreign forces, his Apple Daily newspaper reported on Friday, citing a police source.

Lai, an ardent critic of Beijing, would be the highest profile person charged under the sweeping new law imposed on the Chinese-ruled city in June.

He was due to appear in court on Saturday, according to Apple Daily, a popular tabloid known for its feisty and critical coverage of China and Hong Kong.

The security law, which punishes what Beijing broadly defines as secession, subversion, terrorism and collusion with foreign forces with up to life in jail, has been condemned by the West and human rights groups as a tool to crush dissent in the semi-autonomous, Chinese-ruled city.

Authorities in Hong Kong and Beijing say it is vital to

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Hong Kong media publisher Jimmy Lai is charged under national security law

And earlier this year, Beijing effectively expelled American journalists from The Washington Post, New York Times and Wall Street Journal in retaliation for the Trump administration’s new restrictions on Chinese state media.

Lai, who was arrested by investigators in August, is the fourth and highest-profile person to be charged under the security law, which seeks to eradicate dissent in Hong Kong by curtailing constitutional rights, including free speech. He has been in detention for a week for allegedly flouting terms of his office lease, and turned 72 in jail on Tuesday.

The billionaire, who founded the Apple Daily newspaper in support of Hong Kong’s democracy movement, has become a prime target of the Chinese Communist Party’s efforts to silence its critics, some of whom fled abroad as its crackdown on Hong Kong intensified this year. Lai was previously arrested in February, then in April and again in August, the last

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Hong Kong rebel media tycoon Jimmy Lai becomes most prominent person charged under national security law

He is accused of colluding with foreign forces.

Lai is the most-high profile person so far to be charged under the sweeping new law, which Beijing imposed on Hong Kong at the end of June to clamp down on the pro-democracy movement after last year’s unrest. The law targets succession, subversion, terrorism and collusion with foreign forces, but critics say it breaches the “one country, two systems” framework, which is meant to guarantee Hong Kong people a degree of autonomy and freedoms not afforded to the mainland.

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Hong Kong media tycoon Jimmy Lai charged under security law

HONG KONG (AP) — Hong Kong pro-democracy activist and media tycoon Jimmy Lai has been charged under the city’s national security law as authorities step up a crackdown on dissent, local media reported.

Lai, who founded the Apple Daily tabloid, was charged on suspicion of colluding with foreign forces and endangering national security, local broadcaster TVB reported Friday. He is the most high-profile person out of more than two dozen charged under the sweeping law since it was imposed by Beijing in June.

He is scheduled to appear in court on Dec. 12, and could face a maximum punishment of life imprisonment.

Police said in a statement that they arrested a 73-year-old man under the national security law, but did not name him.

Lai was arrested in August. He and two executives of Next Digital, the company that operates the Apple Daily newspaper, were later charged with fraud over accusations

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